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Dhulbahante

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The Dhulbahante (Somali: Duulbaahaante, Arabic: ضولباهانت‎) is a Somali clan, and a part of the Harti confederation of Darod clans. Members of the clan primarily inhabit the northern Sool, Nugaal, Sanaag and Ayn (a new province carved out of Togdheer) regions, the Haud, some parts of Hargeisa, the port city of Kismayo, as well as other areas in the Jubbada Hoose region of southern Somalia.

ContentsEdit

[hide]*1 Tradition

[edit]TraditionEdit

Currently, there there are 15 active "Garaad(s), (clan chiefs). The leader of the traditional Dhulbahante Garaad(s) is Garaad Jaamac Garaad Cali.[1][2]Politically, all clan chiefs strongly oppose the existence of Somaliland (see the Boocame Declaration by Dulbahante Traditional clan chiefs for reference).[3]

Under the leadership of Sayid Mohammed Abdullah Hassan, the Dhulbahante waged war against Britain and Ethiopia for over twenty years, which ended with the British Royal Air Force bombing their command center in Taleex in 1920.[4] The Dulbahante clan lost nearly half of its population in this struggle, and as result, its constituents naturally support Greater Somalia.[5]

[edit]Clan treeEdit

There is no clear agreement on the clan and sub-clan structures and many lineages are omitted. Within the Dhulbahante clan, according to the researches of I.M. Lewis, the Dhulbahante are divided into 50 groups which pay diyya (or blood money for their members. These are gathered into four lineages of unequal size: the Muuse Si'iid, who made up the majority of the clan circa 1960, and in turn is highly segmented into numerous lineages; the Ahmad Si'iid, (also known as the Hayaag), which Lewis estimated to number 1,000 male members at the time but now estimated at 7,500 male members; and the Malbammad Si'iid, and the Yuunis Si'iid, which he described as "small, insignificant, and incapable of independent political action."[6] The following listing is taken from the World Bank's Conflict in Somalia: Drivers and Dynamics from 2005 and the United Kingdom's Home Office publication, Somalia Assessment 2001.[7][8]

[edit]Notable Dhulbahante peopleEdit

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